Why scientists are studying sewage to understand monkeypox and other diseases

0
6


newYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

First, it was COVID-19 that drove some Las Vegas scientists down the drain.

Now it’s monkeypox.

As it turns out, what’s going on in the toilet can tell us a lot about a disease that’s spreading in an area.

That’s how scientists at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas knew how far the monkeypox virus could spread, even before the health department.

Scientists can detect COVID-19 in sewage treatment weeks before anyone tests positive

Student scientists at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas can detect monkeypox and other diseases in human waste.
(Ashley Soriano/Fox News)

They are one of the first in the country to study human waste to detect cases of the Omicron variant of the coronavirus before any cases are officially reported in the region.

They started with monkeypox again, as the number of cases across the country topped 14,000.

Human waste can tell us a lot about the diseases that exist in our community. Scientists in Las Vegas are using sewage to detect monkeypox.

Human waste can tell us a lot about the diseases that exist in our community. Scientists in Las Vegas are using sewage to detect monkeypox.
(Ashley Soriano/Fox News)

They are the second people in the country, after San Francisco, to use a wastewater monitoring program to detect monkeypox, said Dr. Edwin Oh, an associate professor at the UNLV School of Medicine.

“We see a person who may be symptom-free for about 3 to 17 days,” Dr. Oh said. “During this period, we will not be able to see lesions in individuals. But when we examine sewage, we will be able to detect the virus in it. »

Will MONKEYPOX become an “established STD”?Why infectious disease experts think so

Dr. Oh directs UNLV’s wastewater monitoring program.

He and his students concentrated in places where there might be a lot of people, such as schools, bars, shelters and hotels.

They used automated machines to collect samples from sewers.

They then returned to the lab for analysis.

“This is the conversation we need to have now, not necessarily waiting until the number of infections reaches 70,000 or 7 million before we start doing anything. »

Scientists in Las Vegas are collecting sewage samples to study the presence of monkeypox in the area.

Scientists in Las Vegas are collecting sewage samples to study the presence of monkeypox in the area.
(Ashley Soriano/Fox News)

They expect the virus count in the Las Vegas area to increase over the next month.

“We have a sense of déjà vu again with COVID-19 because this infectious disease is spreading,” Dr. Oh said. “We know very little about it, but by using a program like this, we can at least track where this virus might be showing up in various communities.”

Click here for the Fox News app

At this moment, CDC reports most cases New York had 2,744 and California had 2,663.

Wyoming is the only state with no reported cases.



Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here