Prostate cancer prevention, on wheels – zimo news

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Prostate cancer is very treatable…if caught early.

Now a new test method comes to you.

New York’s Mount Sinai Medical Center is launching the first mobile prostate exam bus to help men who might not consider prostate cancer screening.

“Our goal is that with increased education, awareness, and access to testing, we can help detect prostate cancer early, save lives and close the gap in diagnosis and high-risk mortality,” said Dr. Ash Tewari, urology at Mount Sinai Health System Kyung Hyun Kim, professor of surgery and urology at the Icahn School of Medicine. Tewari is a world-renowned urologist who has performed more than 7,000 prostate surgeries and knows how early detection can save lives, which is why his office is across the street.

New Mobile Cancer Unit in Mount Sinai Hospital Services
(Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai/Tisch Cancer Center)

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Dubbed the Mount Sinai Robert F. Smith Mobile Prostate Cancer Screening Unit, the bus will visit communities in New York where men may be at higher risk for prostate cancer, especially African American communities. Mount Sinai estimates that more than 13 percent of black men between the ages of 45 and 79 will develop prostate cancer, and that black men are 70 percent more likely to develop prostate cancer than white men. The American Cancer Society has alarmed that blacks are more than twice as likely to die from prostate cancer as whites.

“The idea of ​​the Robert F. Smith mobile MRI unit was to address a major health concern – the higher incidence and mortality of prostate cancer in black men, which I found not only in my own practice and research, but also in It’s also found nationwide. It’s because of access to health care, the environment, comorbidities, and even specific molecular pathways in black people,” Tewari explained.

The mobile-home-sized bus is named after Vista Equity Partners founder Robert Smith, an African-American Wall Street pioneer who decided to give most of his wealth to charity. He donated nearly $4 million to get the buses on the streets, saying he did so to ensure “we don’t keep losing too many husbands, fathers, uncles, brothers, sons and friends to this disease.”

Robert F. Smith (center) cuts the ribbon for the Mobile Cancer Unit with Steve Harvey, Chris Tucker and entertainer Cedric and members of the Mount Sinai Health System.

Robert F. Smith (center) cuts the ribbon for the Mobile Cancer Unit with Steve Harvey, Chris Tucker and entertainer Cedric and members of the Mount Sinai Health System.
(Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai/Tisch Cancer Center)

“In our great country, at this time of technological breakthrough, it is unconscionable that Black Americans are still suffering staggeringly worse health outcomes. We can fix this,” he said.

Doctors recommend that all men over the age of 55 and black men over the age of 45 consider prostate screening. This can be a simple blood test to determine the amount of PSA, the core prostate-specific antigen, which can indicate the presence of prostate cancer or inflammation, in larger quantities.

From former Secretary of State John Kerry to golfer Arnold Palmer, Major League Baseball icon Joe Torre to musician Frank Zappa, there are celebrities who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer.

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African Americans who have been diagnosed include Harry Belafonte, the late former Secretary of State Colin Powell, Major League Baseball legend Ken Griffey Sr. and Weatherman and “Today Show” character Al Rowe Gram, who later helped publicize the bus with Dr. Tewari, his own diagnosis and successful treatment.

Fox Business senior reporter Charlie Gasparino recently opened up about his prostate cancer battle and surgery.

Robert F. Smith with Dr. Ash Tewari and Chris Tucker before moving the cancer department.

Robert F. Smith with Dr. Ash Tewari and Chris Tucker before moving the cancer department.
(Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai/Tisch Cancer Center)

“I’ve had my PSA levels go up for a year or two,” he said before being diagnosed. “A lot of men don’t want to deal with it, they only deal with it when it’s too late. »

“Take action, follow your doctor’s advice, and don’t be afraid. »

Dr. Tewari’s blue and white buses are designed to facilitate control. He owns the equipment he found in his practice to detect prostate cancer, but on the way, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines, doctors can perform prostate screening procedures such as PSA tests, ultrasounds and bladder analysis, among other procedures.

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The American Cancer Society says more than 3 million men in the U.S. are diagnosed with the disease, which is responsible for more than 34,000 deaths each year.

The message on the side of the Mount Sinai bus says it all: “Do it for you. Do it for them. Find prostate cancer early. »

For more information, please visit: www.mountsiani.org/care/cancer.services/prostate.mobile-screening



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