Drinking several cups of coffee each day may help you live longer, research has found

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It turns out that drinking a few cups of coffee each day can actually do more than just show up to work—it can help you live longer.

Two to three cups Drinking coffee daily has been shown to help people live longer and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, and new study published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology found. These benefits were observed regardless of whether the coffee was caffeinated or not, or whether it was ground or instant coffee, based on an analysis of the habits of nearly 450,000 people.

“Ground, instant, and decaffeinated coffee were associated with equivalent reductions in cardiovascular disease and death from cardiovascular disease or any cause,” said study author Peter Kistler. “The results suggest that light to moderate intake of ground, instant and decaffeinated coffee should be considered part of a healthy lifestyle.”

Specifically, the study looked at the link between moderate coffee consumption and cardiovascular problems, including coronary heart disease, congestive heart failure and ischemic stroke. The participants were free of these diseases at the start, and the researchers asked them how much and what kind of coffee they drank each day, if at all.

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Coffee subtypes and associations with incident arrhythmia, CVD, and mortality. Caffeinated (ground/instant) but not decaffeinated coffee reduced the risk of arrhythmia. Both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee reduced the incidence of cardiovascular disease and the risk of death from all causes and cardiovascular risks.

European Journal of Preventive Cardiology


The researchers followed the participants for a median of 12.5 years.

During this time, cardiovascular disease was diagnosed in more than 43,000 participants, 9.6% of the total. The researchers found that those who drank two to three cups of coffee a day had the lowest risk of developing the disease, and those who drank ground, instant and decaffeinated coffee had a 20%, 9% and 6% reduction in their odds, respectively.

Another 30,100 people were diagnosed with arrhythmia. While ground and instant coffee were found to reduce the risk of this development, decaffeinated coffee did not help, the researchers found. Unlike other areas, drinking even more coffee caused the condition, with those drinking four to five cups a day experiencing the lowest reduced risk. Those who drink two to three cups also experienced a significantly reduced risk.

By the end of the study, 27,809 (6.2%) participants had died. However, all types of coffee were found to be associated with a reduction in death from any cause, with two to three cups a day showing the greatest benefit. Ground coffee, decaffeinated and instant coffee were associated with 27%, 14% and 11% lower odds of death, respectively.

Kistler said that while caffeine is the most well-known aspect of coffee, it probably isn’t the reason for the drink’s life-saving abilities. Coffee has more than 100 biologically active components, he said.

“It is likely that decaffeinated compounds were responsible for the positive relationships observed between coffee drinking, cardiovascular disease and survival,” he said. “Our findings suggest that drinking modest amounts of coffee of all types should not be discouraged, but can be enjoyed as a heart-healthy behavior.”

This study adds to previous research that coffee, especially several cups a day, has several health benefits.

One 2018 study found that over a 10-year study period, roughly 10% consumed coffee 15% less chance of death than those who did not drink coffee. Another, published last year, found that drinking three to four cups of coffee, regardless of whether it was caffeinated, reduced the risk of developing and dying from chronic liver disease.

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