Children’s COVID vaccine not as effective on Omicron as Delta, but avoids serious illness from both: study

0
7


newYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

According to one study, the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine was less protective against the omicron variant than the childhood delta strain, but protected against severe disease with both variants. published research in the New England Journal of Medicine on Wednesday.

During the omicron surge, COVID-19 vaccinations for children aged 5 to 11 cut hospitalizations for COVID-19 by more than two-thirds and prevented serious illness, the report said.

According to Dr. Adrienne Randolph, MD, MS, of Boston Children’s Hospital and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

COVID-19 Pandemic Impacts Critical Medical Support Communities

“The reason children are vaccinated against COVID-19 is to prevent serious complications from SARS-CoV-2 infection, including hospitalization,” Randolph said in a statement. Press release.

Children and adults holding red hearts with stethoscope, heart health, health insurance concept
(Source: iStock)

“This evidence shows that vaccination significantly reduces this risk in children aged 5 to 11 years. Although vaccination with omicron provides adolescents with less protection from hospitalization compared with delta, it protects against severe disease in both variants. disease. “

OMICRON BA.2 sub-variant is already popular worldwide

The study looked at 1,185 hospitalized patients with Covid-19 between the ages of 5 and 18 and 1,627 control patients with undiagnosed Covid-19 of similar age at 31 pediatric hospitals in 23 states from July 2021 to February 2022 The data.

Overall, 88% of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 were unvaccinated and 25% required life support measures, the researchers found.

They dug deeper and found that 92% of children aged 5-11 hospitalized with COVID-19 were not vaccinated. Of these, 16% were considered critically ill and required life-saving interventions such as intubation. Of this group, 90 percent were unvaccinated, according to the study release.

OMICRON subvariant BA.2: Health officials call it a ‘worrisome variant’

Among 12- to 18-year-olds hospitalized with COVID-19, 87% were unvaccinated. The study showed that 27% were seriously ill, and 93% of them were unvaccinated. Two children died, the statement said.

A researcher is pushing for schools to reopen to mitigate the deteriorating mental health consequences of affected children.

A researcher is pushing for schools to reopen to mitigate the deteriorating mental health consequences of affected children.
(in stock)

According to the study, two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine were 68 percent effective in preventing omicron hospitalizations in the group of children aged 5 to 11. Because this age group has only recently become eligible for the vaccine, they cannot effectively count the number of severe illnesses alone, the researchers said in the statement.

The study authors also said that in the 12-18 age group, vaccination with the delta variant was 92 percent effective against hospitalization, while the omicron variant was 40 percent effective.

Despite the decline, the study authors said vaccination was 96 percent effective in preventing severe disease cases during delta and 79 percent during micron.

Click here for the Fox News app

Although vaccines are now available to both children and teens, researchers say parents are still hesitant to get vaccinated, with only 57% of 12- to 17-year-olds and 27% of 5- to 11-year-olds vaccinated as of March 16 Two vaccines. dose of vaccine. , according to a report citing CDC data collected by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

An Israeli health worker administers a dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine to a student at the al-Manahel school in the Druze village of Majdal Shams in Israel's annexed Golan Heights on December 12, 2021.

An Israeli health worker administers a dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine to a student at the al-Manahel school in the Druze village of Majdal Shams in Israel’s annexed Golan Heights on December 12, 2021.
(JALAA MAREY/AFP via Getty Images)

“We hope our findings will help parents make decisions about vaccinating their children and teens against COVID-19,” Randolph said in the statement. “The benefits clearly outweigh the risks, as severe infection in childhood can have long-term consequences. as a result of. ”



Source link

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here